Based on original research and unpublished archival materials in four countries and several languages, Raboy's book is the first to connect significant parts of Marconi's story, from his early days in Italy, to his groundbreaking experiments, to his protean role in world affairs.


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Marconi: The Man Who Networked the World

Oxford University Press, July 2016

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Marconi: The Man Who Networked the World made the Governor General's Literary Awards 2016 shortlist!

For more information: http://ggbooks.ca

Non-fiction shortlist finalists:

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Marconi [Leonardo DiCaprio, the way he played J. Edgar Hoover] was as big as Citizen Kane, so the film opens with a “Rosebud” scene. He is on his deathbed, in Rome, on July 20, 1937:

It had been a sweltering day, one of those days where the city shuts down but for the most urgent, or the most frivolous, affairs. In mid-morning he had seen his young wife [Kristen Stewart] and seven-year-old daughter [Mia Talerico] off to the seaside. The next day was the child’s birthday and he was planning to join them. Then he went to the office, met with Solari [F. Murray Abraham], his associate of the past 35 years. The country was in turmoil and business was not going as well as he would have liked, but that’s the way it was. The political situation was more worrisome. He had an appointment to see Mussolini [Anthony Hopkins] at six o’clock.
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Raboy shares his dream cast for an adaptation of his new book, Marconi: The Man Who Networked the World, and situates them in the opening scene:

mybookthemovie.blogspot.ca
Marshal Zeringue

"In a New Biography, How Marconi’s Start-Up Changed the World"

Book review by Greg Milner
Aug. 19, 2016

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"[Raboy ] is especially adroit at portraying how Marconi was swept up in the modern world he helped create... Marconi really hums when Raboy details how his subject was implicated in the social and political effects of wireless... Marconi, which functions as a cultural history as much as a biography, reminds us that in its earliest incarnations, wireless had a romance and mystique."

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